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Synthesis

Adolescence; a critical Evolutionary Adaptation

This Paper has been written in response to an increasing concern that formal education, especially at the secondary level, is failing to meet the needs and expectations of young people for an appropriate induction into adult life and responsibilities.

The Challenge of Synthesis; Making sense of Research Across the Biological and Social Sciences

Wesley College Institute (Melbourne) Advisory Committee 27th May 2006   Presentation by John Abbott, President The 21st Century Learning Initiative (U.K. and International) Currently in a Partnership with Wesley College to explore new thinking and directions for schooling during the Adolescent years   The Challenge of Synthesis; Making sense of Research Across the biological and […]

Can the Learning Species fit into schools?

If we humans are the planet’s pre-eminent learning species surely none but the most obdurate of young people should readily accept the benign conditions of the classroom?

Learning to Go with the Grain of the Brain

If young people are to be equipped effectively to meet the challenges of the 21st century it is surely prudent to seek out the very best understandings from current scientific research into the nature of how humans learn before considering further reform of the current system.

This article by John Abbott and Terence Ryan appeared in the Spring, 1999 issue of Education Canada.

Children need Communities; Communities need Children

Communities have done young people a grave disservice by separating the world of learning from the world of work

Teaching for Understanding

This article first appeared in the appeared in the Fall, 1993 issue of American Educator, the journal of The American Federation of Teachers. We reprint it here with permission of AFT and of Professor Perkins, co-director of Project Zero at the Harvard University.

Some Recent Developments in Cognitive Science

While all children need both a body of knowledge and some basic skills to enable them to be functionally literate, a rapidly changing society demands that young people be able to rise above such rote, factual levels to think critically, and creatively; to be flexible, and spontaneously to be able to solve ill structured, ambiguous problems in areas in which they have little first hand information.

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